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Galloway's Book on Running

Running 1996

Marathon!

Return of the Tribes

The Five Stages of Running

The Running Revolution

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Return of the Tribes

Jeff Galloway set the American record for 10 miles (47:49) in 1973, was on the 1972 Olympic track team, and ran a 2:16 marathon at age 35.

He is also an articulate running teacher, able to translate world-class running knowledge into concepts that help runners of all levels.

Jeff’s book Galloway’s Book on Running , has sold over 350,000 copies and is in 5 languages. Jeff has written a new book, Marathon: You Can Do It! (2001), specifically teaching his program for running a marathon. Return of the Tribes (1995), is available by calling JFG Ltd., 1-800-200-2771.

The following are excerpts from Return of the Tribes:

The Starvation Reflex

Our ancient ancestors had to do without food for extended periods of time. In order to better survive, a series of very complex biological and psychological mechanisms inside us are set off when we deprive ourselves of food. Both the appetite and the accumulation of body fat is increased, in order to cope with the threat of starvation: The human organism can do without foods which we need and love to eat for an extended period of time, but is programmed to overcompensate. When the period of deprivation is over, the individual will gradually eat more calories than needed over another extended period of time, to store up more fat than before. This mechanism helped our ancient ancestors prepare for the next starvation period. If we’ve deprived ourselves of special (and often decadent) foods, we will tend to over-consume those foods at some time in the future, when they become available again.

  1. The longer we wait between meals, the more we stimulate the fat-depositing enzymes, so that more of the next meal will be deposited as fat.
  2. The longer we wait between meals, the more we stimulate our appetite, so that we will tend to overeat, and accumulate more excess calories for fat storage.
  3. Many people have a tendency to eat more decadent, fatty foods when they have been waiting a long time to eat, and the higher quantity of fat in these foods produces a greater deposition of body fat.

The longer we deprive ourselves of food, the more we are likely to trigger the starvation reflex. The body organism is stimulated to over-react to adversity, and over-deposit fat for the next deprivation period. Unfortunately, we are also programmed to over-consume food (especially items we really like — but try to avoid) when it is abundant (avoid buffet dinners).

Our ancient ancestors had to do without food for extended periods of time. In order to better survive, a series of very complex biological and psychological mechanisms inside us are set off when we deprive ourselves of food. Both the appetite and the accumulation of body fat is increased, in order to cope with the threat of starvation: The human organism can do without foods which we need and love to eat for an extended period of time, but is programmed to overcompensate. When the period of deprivation is over, the individual will gradually eat more calories than needed over another extended period of time, to store up more fat than before. This mechanism helped our ancient ancestors prepare for the next starvation period. If we’ve deprived ourselves of special (and often decadent) foods, we will tend to over-consume those foods at some time in the future, when they become available again.

  1. The longer we wait between meals, the more we stimulate the fat-depositing enzymes, so that more of the next meal will be deposited as fat.
  2. The longer we wait between meals, the more we stimulate our appetite, so that we will tend to overeat, and accumulate more excess calories for fat storage.
  3. Many people have a tendency to eat more decadent, fatty foods when they have been waiting a long time to eat, and the higher quantity of fat in these foods produces a greater deposition of body fat.

The longer we deprive ourselves of food, the more we are likely to trigger the starvation reflex. The body organism is stimulated to over-react to adversity, and over-deposit fat for the next deprivation period. Unfortunately, we are also programmed to over-consume food (especially items we really like — but try to avoid) when it is abundant (avoid buffet dinners).

Psychological Starvation

It is also counterproductive to tell ourselves that we will never eat a given food again. While we all can deprive ourselves of our decadent favorites by following this over-strict rule, we’re already setting up a powerful negative psychological mechanism. At some point, our appetite will build and when the forbidden food is available, we will almost certainly over-consume it.

It is always better to tell yourself that you will always have that food available, and that you will always be able to eat it. The secret is to physically and mentally (over a period of time) alter your expectations, your appetite, and your behavior toward the food so that you’ll learn to enjoy a small amount of it as much as you currently enjoy a larger amount.

Feeling Better As You Get Older

Significant days off from running:

  • for those 25-35: 2 days off from running
  • for those 35-45: 3 days off from running
  • for those above 45: every other day running program
  1. Extra slow starts to each run:
    • walk for 5 minutes, first
    • jog for 5 minutes (about 3+ minutes per mile slower than you could run the run’s length)
    • ease into the workout pace and never force the muscles to perform when tired, tight, etc.
  2. Extra slow long runs
    • at least 2 minutes per mile slower than you could run that distance on that day (be sure to adjust for heat, humidity, hills, etc.)
    • walking breaks — one minute walks every 3–5 minutes, from the beginning
    • the slower you go, the faster you recover — yet you receive the same endurance
  3. Form adjustments
    • keep from over-striding — especially downhill, in speed sessions, at end of races (shuffle along close to the ground)
    • don’t bounce, keep feet low to the ground
    • don’t get up on your toes — work on quick turnover of feet and legs instead
  4. Treat any possible injury — as an injury
    • Take an extra day (or more) off from running
    • Use ice regularly — a chunk of ice, rubbed directly on the skin
    • Ask your doctor about an anti-inflammatory, such as ibuprofen
  5. Don’t let the left brain push you into overtraining.
    • As we get older, we are able to mentally focus and concentrate.
    • The logical left brain can push us harder and further than we are ready on a given day try to stay under the intuitive control of the right brain.

Mental Rehearsal: Getting out the Door — At the End of a Hard Day

  1. Tell yourself that you’re not going to work out — take the pressure off.
  2. Rehearse putting on exercise clothes, and shoes, as soon as you get home — just to be comfortable.
  3. Walk around the house, listening to upbeat music, have a cup of tea, PowerBar, etc.
  4. Tell yourself that you’re just going to go outside the front door to see what the weather is like.
  5. Once outside you’ll walk to the end of the block — to see what the neighbors are doing.
  6. You decide to walk across the street
  7. You’re on your way!